Home Celebrity Why does Tara Moss have a walking stick? (Full Story)
Why does Tara Moss have a walking stick? (Full Story)

Why does Tara Moss have a walking stick? (Full Story)

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Why does tara moss have a walking stick, According to Tara Moss, recently my husband took the first ever portrait series with my beloved walking stick, ‘Wolfie’. This is one of my favourites. Today I’m posting this to help normalize the use of walking aids, which I sometimes use when required, as do millions of other people of all ages.

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Why does Tara Moss have a walking stick

Recently my husband took the first ever portrait series with my beloved walking stick, ‘Wolfie’. This is one of my favourites. Though I don’t always need my cane, I like how it makes me feel about the times when I do. Thank you, Berndt Sellheim.

PS Back in February I posted a candid photo that showed me using my previous cane, and wrote the following: ‘I realized the other day that this is one of very few photographs with my cane. I’ve consciously avoided being photographed with it, and I’m going to stop that habit now. Today I’m posting this to help normalize the use of walking aids, which I sometimes use when required, as do millions of other people of all ages. Studies show that attitudes and beliefs strongly affect the decision to use mobility aids even in instances when a person would strongly benefit from their use. Let’s normalize it.’

To that mind I have also started a little Insta account solely for my adventures with ‘Wolfie” :

https://www.instagram.com/taraandwolfie.

If you are also a sometime mobility aid user, or otherwise relate to this, I hope you’ll drop me a hello at that new little account.

Wishing you all great adventures, brilliant reads and pain-free days, x Tara

[Image description: Tall woman standing proudly next to an arm chair. She is wearing a blue velvet dress and using her 37 inch walking stick.]

Tara Moss may only be 46, but she is happy for the world to see her using a walking stick to get around.

The crime author told this week’s Stellar magazine that she once hid the stick – which she has nicknamed Wolfie – but is now proud of it.

The former model said: ‘For the first few years, I avoided using it outside the house because I didn’t want the comments or the stares.

While she may not be ‘white haired’ yet, the brunette beauty has been embracing her greying locks.

She tells Stellar: ‘Men look amazing with silver hair. I find it very attractive. I find it very attractive on women as well.

‘Not everyone is going to like what I look like or my hair – and I can’t really care about that,’ she said.

Model and author Tara Moss is suing a NSW GP for an “extremely large” sum, claiming his negligence left her with permanent injury, chronic pain and in need of a walking stick nicknamed Wolfie.

However, the doctor’s lawyers have argued it was Moss who was negligent, saying she failed to…

However, the doctor’s lawyers have argued it was Moss who was negligent, saying she failed to mention hip pain at any point over the time she was seen by Blue Mountains physician Dr Chris Coghill.

In the NSW Supreme Court on Wednesday, Moss’s lawyer Richard Cheney outlined why the 47-year-old Canadian-born crime writer would be seeking substantial damages from the doctor.

Moss is unfit to undertake her modelling, media and public speaking events as a result of her condition, and requires domestic assistance, he said.

“It’s potentially an extremely large claim.”

Tara Moss
Model and author Tara Moss claims a NSW GP’s negligence left her with a permanent hip injury. Credit: AAP
She continues to write, with her latest novel released in 2019, and has also turned her hand to disability advocacy.

On Instagram Moss has, since 2016, detailed needing the assistance of her wheelchair and walking stick – which is named Wolfie and has its own Instagram account with more than 5500 followers.

In the statement of claim tendered to the court, Moss said she regularly presented to the doctor over 18 months, reporting serious pelvic pain that left her struggling to stand and walk.

The pain was so extreme she twice visited hospital.

“She attended on the defendant, complaining of pain on no fewer than eight occasions in the period … without (him undertaking) any proper examination of the area subject to the complaint, and certainly without arranging MRI investigations,” Cheney said on Wednesday.

Her discomfort was at different stages put down to her sciatica, suspected endometriosis, neurological issues and potential appendicitis, the statement of claim says.

Only when she attended another GP in March 2018 – more than two years after she first complained of pain – was the cause identified.

That doctor conducted an examination of her pelvic area, diagnosing her with a suspected tear to the fibrocartilage in her right hip, which an MRI scan soon confirmed.

Moss underwent surgery to repair the tear in May 2018.

That is what Coghill should have done from the outset, Moss argues, as he knew she had recently undergone medical procedures during which that kind of injury was a risk.

But for his negligence, Moss would have been referred for diagnostic imaging in a timely manner, been diagnosed up to two years earlier, and have avoided permanent injury or the need for surgery, the statement of claim says.

She also would have avoided the development of secondary complications such as chronic hip and back pain, an abnormal gait and mental harm.

But lawyers for Coghill are relying on the defence that he at all times provided competent professional practice.

They contend Moss failed to ever advise Coghill that she was suffering from hip pain, and that even if he was negligent, that didn’t necessarily cause the patient’s injuries.

“The defendant says that if any damages were suffered by the plaintiff as alleged, which is denied, they were caused or contributed to by (her) own negligence,” the filed defence says.

On Wednesday, Cheney also sought the inclusion of reports from another two doctors to support Moss’s case.

But Coghill’s barrister argued the “tsunami of reports” they were seeking to tender duplicated expert opinions already included and would only blow out the length of the matter and legal costs.

Associate Justice Joanne Harrison reserved her judgement.

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