Home News Ghana Culture Forum 9th Ghana Culture Day Celebration
Ghana Culture Forum 9th Ghana Culture Day Celebration

Ghana Culture Forum 9th Ghana Culture Day Celebration

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The world has a shared history and a rich, diverse cultural heritage. This heritage is cherished globally as an asset that belongs to us all, yet gives our societies their identity and binds them together, nurturing a rich cultural and creative present and future.

That is why stakeholders of the creative and cultural world must do everything in their power to preserve this heritage and the diversity of actual cultural content, amid a political and economic climate that is subject to major upheavals (EY, 2015).

It is an acceptable fact globally that Culture is the transformational cornerstone of national development and economic growth.

It has been the natural foundation upon which societies have built up their economic life. It is the most important wheel of the modern society. The value of culture as expressed by the tangibles and intangibles and its impact on our lives cannot be lost.

Ghana Culture Forum 9th Ghana Culture Day Celebration

From the most important aspect of our social discourse to the integrated network of creative technology that has influenced expenditure and the development of an existing employment architecture.

The tangible expressions of culture for economic gains is collectively classified as the Culture and Creative Industries.

For the purposes of this symposium, we shall restrict ourselves to the definition of “Culture and Creative industries” (CCI) by UNESCO as activities “whose principal purpose is production or reproduction, promotion, distribution or commercialization of goods, services and activities of a cultural, artistic or heritage-related nature.”

For the Ghana Culture Forum, our classification of the sub sectors of the CCIs include activities of the literary arts, performing arts, music, audio-visual, visuals arts and culinary arts.

Aside the economic benefits of the tangible expressions, the cultural and creative industries rely on the intangible expressions of culture which generate non-monetary value that contributes significantly to achieving socially inclusive and sustainable development.

To this end, public policies are needed to support the diverse forms of creativity at the heart of the cultural and creative industry sectors as well as to address new challenges posed by technology.

Ghana Culture Forum 9th Ghana Culture Day Celebration

In December 2015 a report titled “Cultural times: The first global map of cultural and creative industries,” was published.

Conducted by EY (Ernst & Young Global Limited, a multinational professional services firm headquartered in London), the study was commissioned by CISAC, the International Confederation of Authors and Composers Societies.

It was aimed at analysing the cultural and creative markets in the world. Major findings of the study are as follows: 1. CCI is the biggest industry in terms revenue assumption and employment numbers CCI revenues worldwide exceed those of telecom services (US$1,570b globally), and surpass India’s GDP (US$1,900b).

Within the total, the top three earners are television (US$477b), visual arts (US$391b), and newspapers and magazines (US$354b).

With 29.5 million jobs, CCI employ 1% of the world’s active population. The top three employers are visual arts (6.73m), books (3.67m) and music (3.98m).

Revenues (US$b in 2013) Employment (2013) CCI 2,250 29.5 million Industries Telecom services 1,570 Automotive Industry in Europe, the US and Japan combined 25 million Countries 1,900 South Korea’s workforce 26.6 million Sources: Cultural times: the first global map of cultural and creative industries, EY, 2015; World Development Indicators — The World Bank, 2015; Thomson Reuters (2015), Walmart (2015), Telecommunications services report, Ibisworld, 2014; Advanced industries, McKinsey, 2013 2.

Cultural and creative content drives demand for electronics and digital devices CCI are a locomotive of the online economy — contributing US$200b to global digital sales in 2013. Cultural and creative content also powers sales of digital devices, which totalled US$530b in 2013.

Ghana Culture Forum 9th Ghana Culture Day Celebration

Digital cultural goods are, by far, the biggest revenue source for the digital economy, generating US$66b of B2C sales in 2013 and US$21.7b of advertising revenues for online media and free streaming websites. 3. Culture boosts cities’ attractiveness CCI are a locomotive of the online economy — contributing US$200b to global digital sales in 2013. Cultural and creative content also powers sales of digital devices, which totalled US$530b in 2013. Digital cultural goods are, by far, the biggest revenue source for the digital economy, generating US$66b of B2C sales in 2013 and US$21.7b of advertising revenues for online media and free streaming websites. 4.

The informal economy is a vast reservoir of jobs Informal CCI sales in emerging countries were estimated to total US$33b in 2013 and to provide 1.2 million jobs. Performing arts are the biggest employers in the informal economy, providing unofficial music and theatre performances (street performances, festivals and concerts that do not pay authors’ rights, private performances at marriages and funerals, etc.), which are often free for audiences. In Africa, these performances are sometimes funded by individual sponsors.

The study concludes that, to unlock the full potential of CCI, creators must be fairly remunerated for the use of their creative works, so that they can continue contributing to culture and the economy.

In particular in the digital market, policy makers need to address the transfer of value currently taking place in favour of Internet intermediaries, and ensure that creators and the creative industries are paid fairly for the exploitation of their works.

In spite of vast opportunities offered by culture, interestingly a comparative study of the markets showed that Africa-Middle East markets pulled the minimum revenues (refer to statistics on the next page). Asia-Pacific: 34 % of global CCI Revenues.

40 % of jobs with the largest consumer base and a fast rising middleclass. Leader in Gaming. Growing fast in Movies and Books. Europe: 32 % of global CCI Revenues. 25 % of jobs cultural economy is rooted in history, underpinned by strong public support, a highly educated population and a strong concentration of creators.

North America: 28 % of global CCI Revenues. 15 % of jobs. Strong international influence and leader Movies, TV, and Performing Arts. Latin America: 6% of global CCI Revenues. 16% of jobs TV is King. Latin American TV shows travel worldwide, as well as music and dance. Africa and Middle East: 3% of global CCI Revenues. 8% of jobs. Opportunities in Film production. TV, and Music. Informal economy for example unofficial music performances is a significant part of the cultural scene, and a reservoir of jobs.

Sources: Cultural times: the first global map of cultural and creative industries, EY, 2015; World Development Indicators — The World Bank, 2015; Thomson Reuters (2015), Walmart (2015), Telecommunications services report, Ibisworld, 2014; Advanced industries, McKinsey, 2013 What could be the contributing factors to the low numbers when Africa has been globally characterised as the haven of culture? What can be done to make the Ghanaian cultural space economically viable and more importantly attract a pool of potential investors to bring the transformation envisaged? 14th of March every year has been designated as Ghana Culture Day by the stakeholders in the culture and arts space. This year marks the 9th edition of the celebrations.

Ghana Culture Forum 9th Ghana Culture Day Celebration

The main event of this year’s celebrations is a cultural symposium. As a network of cultural practitioners, the Ghana Culture Forum sets out to make our rich culture a platform to promote the cultural and creative economy as we protect and project our identity as Ghanaians.

We believe also that Ghana has a lot of great cultural experiences and institutions that are supposed to facilitate the process of creating an environment that allows its citizens to promote their creativity and generate wealth for the people and nation.

To this effect, we chose the theme of this symposium, Culture – Translating “Values” into Economic Opportunities, to attempt to explore the vast economic potentials in the cultural space of Ghana and how we can maximise these opportunities to increase the economic growth and employment.

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